Consequentialist vs nonconsequentialist

Virtue Ethics As mentioned earlier, this theory solely focuses on ideals. European welfare states and social trust. As a result, it could be argued that there is a moral imperative for an agent to inform himself as much as possible about a situation before judging the appropriate course of action.

Sinnott-Armstrong b or built into public institutions Rawls This position allows consequentialists to recognize the possibility of irresolvable moral dilemmas Sinnott-Armstrong81; Railton This approach could be built into total consequentialism with rights weighed against happiness and other values or, alternatively, the disvalue of rights violations could be lexically ranked prior to any other kind of loss or harm cf.

Utilitarianism and Cooperation, Oxford: Virtue Ethics The central question is, 'What kind of a person should I be? In other words, if you want to find out what you ought to do, it is essential to understand what the ultimate goal of ethics is.

Journal Of Politics, 70 3 Some critics argue that not all pleasures are valuable, since, for example, there is no value in the pleasures that a sadist gets from whipping a victim or that an addict gets from drugs. Consequentialism Consequentialism is a type of teleological theory -- consequentialist theories suggest that the moral value, the moral rightness or wrongness of an act, is entirely a function of the consequences, or the results of that act.

The best argument for rule-consequentialism is that it does a better job than its rivals of matching and tying together our moral convictions, as well as offering us help with our moral disagreements and uncertainties.

Mill used a different strategy to avoid calling push-pin as good as poetry. Cambridge University Press, pp. Another indirect version is virtue consequentialism, which holds that whether an act is morally right depends on whether it stems from or expresses a state of character that maximizes good consequences and, hence, is a virtue.

Action guidance[ edit ] One important characteristic of many normative moral theories such as consequentialism is the ability to produce practical moral judgements. However, there is nothing incoherent about proposing a decision procedure that is separate from one's criterion of the right.

Oxford University Press, 97— Individual moral agents do not know everything about their particular situations, and thus do not know all the possible consequences of their potential actions. Some virtue ethicists hold that consequentialist theories totally disregard the development and importance of moral character.

Some virtue ethicists hold that consequentialist theories totally disregard the development and importance of moral character. By dropping one or more of those claims, descendants of utilitarianism can construct a wide variety of moral theories.

Consequentialism

Eudaemonist theories Greek eudaimonia, "happiness" hold that the goal of ethics consists in Consequentialist vs nonconsequentialist function or activity appropriate to man as a human being, and thus tend to emphasize the cultivation of virtue or excellence in the agent as the end of all action.

According to utilitarianisma good action is one that results in an increase in pleasureand the best action is one that results in the most pleasure for the greatest number.

See also Kagan48— Finally, following Foot's lead, one might adopt a sort of consequentialism that argues that virtuous activity ultimately produces the best consequences. It does not hold true if the two requirements are in conflict. For this reason, some theorists have argued that consequentialist theories can only require agents to choose the best action in line with what they know about the situation.

Some, like Henry Sidgwickargue that a certain degree of egoism promotes the general welfare of society for two reasons: Suppose I give a set of steak knives to a friend. Classic utilitarianism is consequentialist as opposed to deontological because of what it denies.Consequentialism is the class of normative ethical theories holding that the consequences of one's conduct are the ultimate basis for any judgment about the rightness or wrongness of that conduct.

Thus, from a consequentialist standpoint, a morally right act (or omission from acting) is one that will produce a good outcome, or consequence. Consequentialism and Nonconsequentialism DPA Ethics & Social Responsibility Dr.

Robert Wright November 11, Prudence Conner Consequentialism vs. Non consequentialism theories of ethics A consequentialist theory judges the rightness or wrongness of an action based on the consequences that action has (Marietta, ).

Consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics are moral theories that evaluate morality on the basis of different factors. This Buzzle post explains the consequentialism vs. deontology vs. In this essay Kant’s ethical non-consequentialist theory will be briefly investigated and a comparison drawn between the two different theories in order to establish merit in employment thereof in practice.

Consequentialism is the class of normative ethical theories holding that the consequences of one's conduct are the ultimate basis for any judgment about the rightness or wrongness of that conduct.

Thus, from a consequentialist standpoint, a morally right act (or omission from acting) is one that will produce a good outcome, or consequence. Consequentialist and non-consequentialist ethics are both centered around the idea of judging actions.

But, there are other approaches to morality as well.

Consequentialism

Virtue ethics examines moral character.

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Consequentialist vs nonconsequentialist
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